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The next Plan Commission Meeting is Monday November 22th, 2021 - 6:00PM
The next Regular Board Meeting is Wednesday December 15th, 2021 - 7:00 PM


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VILLAGE OF FERRYVILLE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
2009-2029
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TEXT

CHAPTER NUMBER TITLE PAGES
1 ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
2 HOUSING
3 TRANSPORTATION
4 UTILITIES AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES
5 AGRICULTURE, NATURAL, AND CULTURAL RESOURCES
6 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
7 INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION
8 LAND USE
9 IMPLEMENTATION

MAPS
FIGURE NUMBER TITLE
1 EXTRATERRITORIAL AREA, ROADS
2 STREETS AND ROADS
3 (Not used)
4 2005 MASTER PLAN MAP
5 (Not used)
6 LAND USE, FLOOD PLAINS, NATURAL AREAS, LANDSCAPES
6-A SUGAR RIVER VALLEY CONSERVANCY LANDS, FLOOD PLAIN, LAND USE
7 SOILSMAP



1 - ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
1.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
The purpose of this section is to provide basic background information for the comprehensive planning process and general demographic characteristics for the Village of Ferryville. More specifically this section includes information from the community survey and visioning sessions, community profile and projection data including population trends, age distribution, and population projections. It is 1mportant to note in this introduction that, where maps are required per state statute, that individual sections make reference to certain identified maps in other sections. Also, the general goals and objectives listed below are considered to cover all sections of this plan and may be supplemented with additional goals and objectives in individual sections.

1.2 GOALS, OBJECTIVES, POLICY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The following are the overall issues and opportunities goals, objectives, and policy recommendat1ons for the Village of Ferryville. The essence of these recommendations is reflected throughout the entire document. The existing Ferryville Master Plan shall serve as background ana reference basis for the Comprehensive Plan and those requirements or proposals also shall be considered part of this Comprehensive Plan as applicable or relevant.
1. Protect and improve the health, safety, and welfare of the community. Preserve and enhance the quality of life.
2. Protect and preserve the community character.
3. Provide suitable facilities for the continued operation of Village government.
4. Control the future development of Ferryville in an orderly fashion, per the requirements of this plan and local ordinances.
5. Be aware that all decisions have a possible effect on taxes.
1.3 BACKGROUND
Under the Comprehensive Planning legislation , adopted by the state in October of 1999, beginning on January 1, 2010, if a local governmental unit engages in any of the actions listed below, those actions shall be consistent with that local governmental unit's Comprehensive Plan.
1. Official Mapping
2. Local Subdivision Regulations
3. Village Zoning Ordinances
4. Zoning of Shorelands, Wetlands, and Flood Plains.
1.3.1 General Village History
Ferryville has a history that can be termed typical of river towns along the Mississippi River, with fishing, farming and limited industry. One important factor in this Village is the proximity to the Mississippi River where recreational activities are an attraction for residents and visitors alike. There are four relatively different topographical areas of interest in developing plans for the future. These are: the "Downtown" area along the Mississippi River, straddling Highway 35; the Sugar Creek Valley in the southeast part of town; the ridge-top area, former farmland, recently developed as Eagle Mountain Subdivision, some 460 feet above the Highway 35 area; and the lower elevation areas, immediately alongside the Mississippi River are within the flood plain (the general limits of this flood plain are shown on the map, Figure Numbers 6 &6A). The Village of Ferryville has adopted an ordinance, "Combined Flood Plain and Shoreland-Wetland Zoning Ordinance" in Chapter 11 of the ordinances as recommended by Wisconsin DNR.
Early development was adjacent to the river and the railroad. Highway 35 is the main "street" in this area. A few small streets project off this thoroughfare. One plat is located a block from Highway 35, Maple Street at the south part of the village. Early platting also included the lowland in the flood plain of the Mississippi. However, the development of the river for barge traffic in 1928 included dam construction that flooded those lowlands. No development took place on the bluffs overlooking the river, other than farming (within the Village Limits).
The population varies from older, retired persons to younger families. However, the older and retired population is by far the majority at present. It is expected that the aging of the younger folks as well as the moving in of retirees will result in even higher percentage of senior citizens in town. Population has varied from 227 in 1980, 154 in 1990 and 174 in 2000. With the increased number of housing units expected in subdivisions, future population is likely to be somewhat above 200. It is unlikely that a significant increase in population will take place in the future without annexation of adjacent land in the Town of Freeman. It also is unlikely that an increase of significance will take place in employment opportunities within the Village due to very limited space for potential industry or commercial facilities. Income levels are unlikely to increase, since the larger expected retirement population is likely to be on fixed income. increased educational opportunities are available elsewhere to students in the community.
Water supply in the past and at present is by individual private water supply wells. No municipal water supply is present.
The areas near the Mississippi River are served by a 20-year-old sanitary sewer system feeding a treatment facility consisting of lagoons. The Eagle Mountain area and scattered housing in the Sugar Creek Valley are not served by this municipal sanitary sewer, but by private wastewater disposal systems (septic tanks). Electric power is provided by Alliant Energy and Scenic Rivers Energy. Telephone service within the Village is provided by CenturyTel, while Vernon Telephone Cooperative provides that service outside the Village. There is no city gas service, but instead private propane tanks serve the heating needs. Cable is provided by Mediacom in some areas. Internet service is provided by Mediacom, CenturyTel, and Richland-Grant Telephone.
Level land is very scarce and therefore most of the original development has been placed along the steep hillside, alongside the railroad on present Highway 35. Changes in these areas will involve strong consideration of the severe topographical limitations. The opportunity to develop off-street parking in the downtown area is severely limited by the steep topography. Likewise, development of platted lots on the steep hillside is not likely to occur in the future. The Sugar Creek Valley areas, above flood plain, and ridge tops now in woods could be developed for building and other purposes, as the main opportunity for increased residential areas within the village limits.
Many of the housing and commercial units are quite old. In the year 2005, Ferryville adopted )( the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code and all new and major remodeling building jobs must conform to that code. Older buildings are grandfathered in, but major modifications must meet the code.
In the l 950's, Village officials annexed or included in the corporate boundaries considerable land away from the Mississippi River where considerably less steep land is present. One part of this area, at the top of the river bluffs, is the Eagle Mountain Subdivision a residential development started in 1990's. That area is currently experiencing added housing units under land use covenants which contain building restrictions. A considerable part of that area is gently rolling on the ridge top. The Stelter Valley Subdivision is located in a valley facing the Mississippi River.
Steeper parts of the remaining undeveloped higher elevation areas are unused and wooded. In the lower, gently rolling land of the Sugar Creek Valley, use is either non-ag or agricultural. It is these areas where future uses and developments are most likely. Within the Village limits, some areas are now devoted to the Mississippi Valley Conservancy and the Bureau of Aeronautics, wetland development programs. Therefore, the undeveloped land within the Village is quite small and is not considered a significant area for growth.
Beyond the current Village limits, most of the areas in nearby Town of Freeman are either wooded or in agriculture use. Topography varies from hilly higher elevations as well as some lesser area as valley country. Some of this extraterritorial area currently is devoted to the Mississippi Valley Conservancy programs. One subdivision has been developed within the extraterritorial limits off from North Buck Creek Road and numerous individual lots have been taken out of agricultural and other uses with relatively new houses then being built. Therefore, with the cooperation of the Town of Freeman, there is the opportunity for Village of Ferryville to have an influence in such developments within the 1.5-mile extraterritorial limits.
1.4 PLANNING AREA
Refer to Figure Number 1 for a map of the planning area considered during this comprehensive planning process. This map shows the Village of Ferryville with the Mississippi River on the southwest and the Township of Freeman to the northeast. The 1.5-mile extraterritorial jurisdiction beyond the Village limits is also indicated. Also, refer to Figure Number 2 which is the current Village of Ferryville street map. Figure Number 4 is the Master Plan map that was developed in 2005. That map is reasonably still valid, except for some changes near the Sugar Creek area (See Figure Number 6A) and it can serve as the basis for a new map showing various area designations, ultimately to guide the possible zoning process.
The Village of Ferryville and the Town of Freeman may work together according to Wis. Statue 62.23 (7a). Class 4 municipalities have extraterritorial jurisdiction to the area 1.5 miles outside of the corporate limits. During the course of this plan, this area shall be considered as part of the planning area.
1.5 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PLAN
As part of the Comprehensive Planning legislation, every community must develop a public participation plan at the beginning of the planning process. The purpose of the public participation plan is to outline procedures for public involvement during every stage of the planning process. Such a plan for public participation is a separate document, entitled "Guidelines for Comprehensive Plan" dated 2-10-2009 and adopted by the Village Plan Commission with Resolution Number 1 dated 2-10-2009.
1.6 COMMUNITY SURVEY
The results of the two community surveys conducted in early 2008 and 2009 provide general background for many of the goals and objectives covered with this plan. The 2008 and 2009 summaries are not included herewith due to complexity of answers. However, strong consideration of the results of each survey was utilized in this Comprehensive Plan.
Each of these surveys generally emphasize improving the quality of life related to the recreational possibilities here as well as cleaning up and improving existing facilities, such as parks and tourist attractions. The surveys downplayed the need for industrial growth.
1.7 COMMUNITY PROFILE ANO PROJECTION
See section 1.3.1 for community background. The labor force projections portion of the plan requirements is rather difficult to detail. The reason for this is the community is gradually changing from one of growing families to one of older people including many individuals who have moved to the Village for retirement and have no plans of working. Thus the future labor force will diminish with time.
1.8 COMMUNITY VISION
A vision statement identifies where an organization (the Village of Ferryville) intends to be in the future and how to best meet the future needs of its stakeholder citizens. The Village of Ferryville Plan Commission utilized the survey information and the public input during plan development to create a formal vision statement.
Our vision is:
1. Create a place where people want to live and build a better future. High in priority is the improvement of tourist and outdoor activities.
2. That the recreational opportunities of our unique location can be enjoyed by many and therefore will be utilized to bring business to our community.
3. To promote our businesses and attract new ones to our area.
4. To maintain and promote our historical sites.
5. To continue to enhance our Village parks and our beautiful setting alongside the Mississippi River.
6. Encourage property owners to improve the overall appearance of Ferryville.
7. To preserve and create a small-town atmosphere with community involvement.
8. To offer diversified and cost-efficient services like cable TV and Internet, sewer, garbage/recycling and keep our Village streets maintained.
9. To continue updating and improving public services such as EMT's, fire department. police, etc.
10. To continue to promote our Village spring and fall clean-up.
11. To promote outdoor activities such as biking, walking, and fishing, etc. Promote all recreational opportunities of the area.
12. To encourage the participation in government operations by volunteers, especially those with expertise in fields where their input will assist Village employees and Board Members in their duties.
13. To protect and foster our natural resources such as the Conservancy Areas, Rush Creek and Sugar Creek recreational areas and the Mississippi River.
14. To consider the tax impact of all activities and developments on the taxpayers of Ferryville, with emphasis on keeping taxes as low as possible. The Village will pursue economical help from State and Federal agencies to assist us in the expenses of operation and improvements. We also will endeavor to obtain outside financial and administrative help in achieving these goals.
15. To develop zoning ordinances and enforce them to improve the safety, welfare, and appearance of the Village.
16. To investigate the details of improving fire safety and a better health situation for the community with a municipal water supply. State funding for public works projects of this type could be pursued.
17. To investigate natural gas services as a supplement to the public utilities.
1.9 ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES - AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS
Throughout each chapter of this comprehensive plan proposed programs or changes may be aided by state and federal agencies. Many of these agencies and programs can provide expertise or funding to help implement some of the recommendations of this comprehensive plan.
It is not our intent to list any of these agencies here since that list is ever changing.
An example of such help was the 2008 development of the River View Park, between Highway 35 (Main Street) and the BNSF Railroad. That improvement was only possible via the Federal Scenic By-ways program and the Wisconsin DNR grants.
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2-HOUSING
2.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
Housing is a necessity of life and an important part of the Comprehensive Plan process. The purpose of this section is to assess the current housing stock in the Village of Ferryville and to identify policies and programs that will help meet existing and forecasted housing demand. The housing stock assessment includes the age, value, and type of existing housing units; as well as occupancy characteristics such as tenure (owner occupied vs. renter occupied), and affordability.
Housing data in this document came from the U.S. Census Bureau and resident's surveys. Included are housing-related results of two community surveys distributed to all Ferryville property owners in the tax statement mailing in December 2007 and 2008.
A survey of existing housing in early 2009 indicates the following general description of existing housing. The Village is divided into two general areas of significantly differing characteristics: the "downtown area" and the Eagle Mountain Subdivision.
See Figure Number 4, the 2005 Master Plan map of the Village with designated areas for suggested zoning classes as well as identifying the main residential areas of the Village.
2.2 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following are the Housing objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) that support the housing decisions in Ferryville over the next 20 years.
1. The Village promotes property maintenance standards to ensure a quality living environment within residential areas. At this time, the Village has an ordinance to help accomplish this with the adoption of the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code.
2. Identify areas and designate land for future housing developments.
3. The Village will encourage contiguous development patterns that preserve and expand upon existing neighborhoods.
4. Any development in the Village area would have to follow residential and commercial zoning ordinances. Building in the extraterritorial areas will require the Town of Freeman and the Village of Ferryville conformance with the Wisconsin statue 62.23 (7a). The summary of surveys from residents indicate zoning is recommended, generally applying to housing.
5. Where and when appropriate, the Village will utilize county, state and federal programs or grants to maintain existing housing or to support the construction of future housing.
6. The Village will encourage the location of multi-family apartment buildings, senior housing, and special needs housing near the Village where there is easier access to public services and facilities.
7. Create standardized lot sizes for new residential development.
8. All residential developments must be approved by the Village Plan Commission.
9. Encourage the use of conservation neighborhood design strategies for rural residential development in appropriate areas.
2.3 HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS

The Village housing is typical of older farm communities, but these areas are limited in expansion by topography. As a result, there is limited opportunity for new housing in the downtown area. The Eagle Mountain subdivision and the Stelter Valley subdivision are the main places where new housing would be expected. However, there the lot sizes, are pre­ determined with at least one acre and up to ten or more acres per residential unit. Housing units in 1980 were 119, in 1990 there were 95 and in 2000 there were 149.
The downtown area of the Village straddling Highway 35, Main Street, near the Mississippi River contains mostly older housing units, both conventional homes as well as several mobile homes.
A small number of apartments are located above or within commercial establishments in the downtown area.
With time, a number of homes in the downtown area will be either upgraded or replaced with more modern structures meeting current building codes.
Subdivisions currently are being developed with housing units that meet current building codes.
One Crawford County elderly housing unit with self-help apartments is present near the Village Hall. With the expected increase in senior citizens, more housing units may be needed.
The main area in need of housing upgrading is along the Highway 35, the older downtown developed area.
Since Ferryville now is under the Wisconsin Uniform Dwellings Code requirements, it would be expected that this requirement alone will help to gradually improve the quality of housing in the future.
2.4 OCCUPANCY CHARACTERISTICS
The general types of housing characteristics are different when comparing the older downtown area to the Eagle Mountain Subdivision. Of the housing units in the downtown section of Village of Ferryville in 2009, most were owner- occupied, a few were renter-occupied, and almost none were vacant. This correlates with a decline in rural rental units throughout the county in the l990's.
In the Eagle Mountain Subdivision, the housing is all new since 1990. About half of the units in 2009 were single family units fully occupied, year around. The other half occupied on occasion as second vacation homes. A few are rented out as weekly vacation homes.
2.5 AGE AND CONDITION CHARACTERISTICS
Of the Village of Ferryville's downtown housing units, about 7/8 were built before 1970 and about half of those were built before 1940.
All Eagle Mountain and Stelter subdivision houses are less than 20 years old.
2.6 STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS
Many housing units in Ferryville do not meet current building codes. Any remodeling under the current Uniform Dwelling Code is expected to rectify many of the deficiencies.
2.7 VALUE CHARACTERISTICS
The Wisconsin Department of Revenue has issued overall value of the properties in Ferryville. In general these valuations appear inflated above the actual, since sales are slower than what sellers would like. Ferryville's housing valuations are likely to increase somewhat as the subdivisions new building projects come about, resulting in the balance of taxes received moving more toward the newer developed areas as carrying a greater and greater share of the tax burden. Older units are expected to increase somewhat in value, but not to the extent of the newer subdivision areas.
2.8 HOUSING AFFORDABILITY CHARACTERISTICS
Housing is considered affordable when the owner or renter's monthly costs do not exceed 30% of their total gross monthly income. A low percentage of rental units is present in Ferryville, with the bulk of the owner-residents being retired or near retirement.
2.9 HOMEOWNER ASSISTANCE
Home ownership assistance programs in Crawford County are administered or coordinated by the Neighborhood Housing Services of Crawford County (NHS). NHS offers a variety of home ownership assistance services, including pre- and post-purchase counseling, home inspection and maintenance advice, down payment and closing cost assistance loans, and several housing rehabilitation loan programs. NHS operates a Home Ownership Center sanctioned by the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation. NHS is a certified HUD counseling agency.
2.10 RENTAL ASSISTANCE
In addition to the programs for homeowners, Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS) administers the Home Rental Rehab Program (HRRP) in Crawford County, which provides zero-interest loans for the repair of rental units.
2.11 AFFORDABLE SENIOR HOUSING
Neighborhood Housing Services of Crawford County (NHS) operates the elderly housing units known as Ferryville Manor, on Pine Street. The demand for these types of units is increasing due to the increased aging of the population.
2.12 OTHER HOUSING PROGRAMS
Due to the limited available area within Ferryville, large scale housing programs are not feasible. In the outlying areas of the extraterritorial limits, the expected housing will be on large lots in privately financed subdivisions. Currently the existing residents surveyed do not wish for low-income housing that would be financed by government programs.
However, due to the many residential units showing disrepair, public programs to assist those homeowners to upgrade are encouraged.
2.13 MOBILE HOMES
Mobile homes currently are not allowed in the Eagle Mountain subdivision by ordinance as well as covenants there. Elsewhere, the current Village ordinance allows them "on a permanent foundation."
Combined Flood Plain and Shoreland-Wetland Zoning Ordinance should be applied to all units, including conventional housing, in the Flood Plain areas, since building units are easily damaged or destroyed by floods.
2.14 GARAGES AS LIVING UNITS
This situation comes about where the owner may wish to build a garage first before building a living unit. In some cases, the owner uses the garage as a temporary living area before he builds his house. While the application for building permits asks if the garage will be used for a living situation, many homeowners have indicated " no" in the application, then the building is used for at least intermittent living quarters. The placement of camping trailers in the building has been done also.
The recommendations of the Plan Commission on these matters should consider the need for some temporary living, storage, or work area before and during house construction, but also consider the detrimental effect of allowing structures to be turned into long term permanent living areas. Specifically, the Wisconsin Uniform Building Code then must be applied to any structure used as a living area and penalties should be assessed per an applicable ordinance.
2.15 NEW SUBDIVISIONS
The available area for new subdivisions is severely limited within the Village limits. Therefore it is unlikely that any significant increase in numbers of housing units can occur. Therefore, the subdivision ordinance should be written to allow for the smallest lot size that is practical and safe from a fire protection and livability standpoint.
The use of clustered housing (Smart Growth) in new sub-divisions also should be encouraged in the remaining undeveloped areas of Ferryville.
In the extraterritorial areas, the new subdivisions likely to be sited can allow larger lot areas and decisions as to lot sizes require cooperation between the Village of Ferryville and the Town of Freeman. It is the recommendation of the Ferryville Plan Commission that the extraterritorial lot sizes be at least a half-acre and preferably one acre.
2.16 OUTSIDE SUPPORT FOR UPGRADING OF HOMES
Efforts should be ongoing to assist homeowners with the expenses of upgrading older homes.
2.17 ZONING
While the general summaries of the community surveys show opposition to zoning, the bulk of the comments asking for improvements cannot be accomplished without zoning. Therefore, zoning for the entire Village area is recommended to concentrate on maintaining and upgrading the quality of housing. Such zoning should be written to avoid placing restrictions on the uses of the individual's properties, but more on the quality of housing and safety, such as fire department access.
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3 - TRANSPORTATION
3.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
A community's transportation infrastructure supports the varied needs of its residents, local businesses, visitors, and through-traffic. The Transportation Chapter summarizes the local transportation system based on local input. A Wisconsin DOT required 5-year plan can serve as a resource guide and implementation tool.
3.2 GOALS
1. Encouragement of neighborhood designs that support a range of transportation choices.
2. Provide an integrated, efficient, and economical transportation system that affords mobility, convenience, safety, affordability and meets the needs of all citizens, including transit-dependent and disabled citizens.
3.3 OBJECTNES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The Village of Ferryville's transportation objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) support the aforementioned goals and will guide transportation decisions over the next 20 years.
1. New roads and driveways shall follow all guidelines set up by the DOT and the Village of Ferryville will enforce this. This will ensure emergency services would be able to get to all homes and businesses.
2. Any new roads to be paved with current Village ordinances.
3. Any new roads to property and new driveways will be the responsibility of the property owner for the construction and cost, unless that becomes a Village street, in which case upkeep would become the Village's (This upon acceptance of the Village Board). The guidelines for construction would be those of the Village of Ferryville and DOT.
4. Dead-end or cul-de-sac roads should provide ample space for emergency vehicles.
5. Explore the creation of a Park and Ride lot in the Village park.
6. Encourage the development and maintenance of recreational trails.
7. Continue to maintain a transportation plan and road improvement tracking along the guidelines of the WISLR software.
3.4 TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND ISSUES
VILLAGE PRIORITIES
1. Transportation safety
2. Transportation to support economic development
3. Recreational transportation uses
4. Tourism
5. Transportation needs of the elderly and disabled
The most satisfactory aspects of the community's transportation system, according to the Plan Commission, are the Village's upkeep of its streets, such as seal coating, road repairs when needed, snow removal, and tracking road conditions and need for improvement.
3.4.1 HIGHWAYS AND LOCAL STREETS
State Highway 35 serves Ferryville.
The Village of Ferryville has a total of 6.15 miles of streets, 1.02 miles of County Trunk Highways and 5.13 miles of local streets. See Figure Number 2.
3.4.2 FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM
The transportation system is classified according to primary function representing very different purposes: 1) mobility and efficient travel and 2) access to properties. Simply put, when there are more access points, carrying capacity is reduced and safety is compromised.
Ferryville has only two types of roads.
Minor collectors link local roads to higher capacity roads and other communities. Local roads provide access to residential, commercial, and industrial development.
3.4.3 TRAFFIC COUNTS
Highway 35 south of DeSoto - 4200 (1996), 4000 (2002), 3900 (2005)
The traffic count shows that traffic volume on Highway 35 has declined from 1996 to 2005. The decline in traffic volume may be in part attributed to the increase of recreational land users (absentee landowners) in the rural areas.
3.5 TRANSPORTATION USERS
3.5.1 TRANSIT
This next section looks at transportation options for commuters, the elderly and disabled, and those who do not drive. There are very few transportation services for Ferryville. The recent loss of Greyhound bus service to several Wisconsin cities causes increased interest in exploring regional transit systems.
3.5.2 WORK CARPOOLING
The majority of commuters drive alone. The Village of Ferryville may be interested in further supporting carpooling through the creation of a formal or informal Park-N-Ride facility.
3.5.3 TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES FOR THE ELDERLY AND DISABLED
Crawford County Senior Resources has several vehicles available to senior county residents (age 60 and over) for transportation to nutrition sites, medical institutions, and work sites, as well as opportunities for shopping, personal business, and social trips.
A privately owned local taxi service provides shared-ride taxi services throughout Crawford County to ambulatory customers. In the past, they had some public support by including a federal grant to support shared-ride taxi services.
The Plan Commission believes that the options for residents who do not drive are not sufficient to meet current needs.
3.6 MODES OF TRANSPORTATION
3.6.1 RAIL FREIGHT
The Class One Railroad, the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) follows the western boundary of Ferryville. BNSF freight includes agricultural, consumer, and industrial products, along with coal. At present the trains do not stop in Ferryville.
3.6.2 PASSENGER RAIL SERVICE
There is no rail passenger service in Ferryville. Amtrak is available in La Crosse which is 48 miles to the north.
3.6.3 AIRPORTS
The La Crosse Municipal Airport is located approximately 50 miles north of Ferryville. The La Crosse Municipal Airport is designated as an air carrier/cargo airport designed to accommodate all aircraft and in some cases wide body jets and military transports.
3.6.4 WATER TRANSPORTATION
Ferryville does not have water transportation access. Prairie du Chien has a port and is less than 25 miles south of Ferryville. Ferryville has a boat landing for recreational and commercial fishing purposes.
3.6.5 SHIPPING
According to a 2004 report by ID A, trucks carry 83% of all manufactured freight transported in Wisconsin. More than 77% of all Wisconsin communities are served exclusively by trucks.
Ferryville is served by State Highway 35.
3.6.6 TRANSPORTATION ANO AGRICULTURE
Transportation is critical for agriculture, yet ag-related transportation needs and impacts are often overlooked. Ag-related transportation operates on several scales, ranging from moving machinery on the system of local roads to moving commodities both through and to larger communities via truck.
3.6.7 BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS
Several bicycle corridors have been identified in the Ferryville area. Information on these corridors can be found on the Crawford County website at http://www.crawfordcountywi.com/adventures/bicycle.htm. The Ferryville Loop is 44 miles.
Hiking options include the Rush Creek State Natural Area north of Ferryville and Sugar Creek Bluff State Natural Area which is on the south end of Ferryville.
3.7 TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
The Plan Commission indicated that the existing transportation infrastructure meets the needs of the jurisdiction's economic development goals related to agriculture, access to retail, commerce, shipping, manufacturing, and tourism.
3.8 MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENTS
3.8.1 PLANNING FOR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
The Plan Commission indicated that the Village of Ferryville does not have a CIP that includes transportation-related expenditures.
3.8.2 WISDOT SOUTHWEST REGION - PLANS AND PROJECTS
Current information from WISDOT's Six-Year Highway Improvement Program shows only a Lynxville - DeSoto project to overlay the existing pavement with seal coat that would affect Ferryville.
3.8.4 ENVIRONMENT
Thoughtful planning for continued growth needs to protect water quality, wildlife habitats, and working farms. Sound management of transportation infrastructure maintenance or expansion may include de-icing procedures and salt reduction, erosion control, storm water management, and wetland mitigation (preservation, creation, or restoration).
3.9 TRANSPORTATION PLANNING
3.9.1 LOCAL AND REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLANS
Crawford County currently uses the Crawford County Functional and Jurisdictional Highway Plan.
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4 - UTILITIES AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES
4.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
The purpose of this section is to inventory, map, and forecast utilities and community facilities in the Village of Ferryville. Utilities and community facilities, often referred to as public works, is the physical infrastructure that allows a community to function and grow. Community facilities may include libraries, municipal offices, schools, police stations, fire stations, parks, etc. Many of the community facilities are supported by utilities including water services, sewer system, storm water drainage, electricity, etc.
It is expected that the population in the Village of Ferryville will grow by 9 tol4% over the next 20 years (see Chapter 1, Issues and Opportunities). This increase in population will undoubtedly increase the demand for public utilities and community facilities. However, the exact need to expand, rehab, or create new utilities and community facilities is difficult to determine. To the extent possible, this chapter tries to forecast the future utility and community facility needs of the Village of Ferryville; however, these needs will vary according to growth pressure and the level of service that is deemed publicly acceptable. In addition, when evaluating whether a utility or community facility will be able to meet future needs it is assumed that some routine maintenance will be needed.
4.2GOALS
Providing adequate infrastructure and public services and an adequate supply of developable land to meet existing and future market demand for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
4.3 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following are the Utilities and Community Facilities objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) that support the above goals and will guide utility and community facility decisions in the jurisdiction over the next 20 years.
1. The Village encourages development within the Village limits that are most effectively served with utilities.
2. Discourage utility extensions into areas environmentally unsuitable to urban development due to soils, flooding, or topography.
3. New development proposals will be examined for impact on public facilities before issuing new development permits.
4. Maintain the existing utility and community facilities so they can support existing development and redevelopment.
5. Maintain a Capital Improvements Program and review it annually.
6. Ensure new development bears a fair share of capital improvement cost necessitated by the development.
7. Encourage well testing as a means of protecting drinking water supplies for private individual well users.
8. When appropriate, utilize county, state, and federal programs and/or grants to maintain, enhance, or pursue new utility and community facilities.
9. Consider the cost and convenience benefits of having a natural gas utility providing natural gas for heating and cooking purposes in Ferryville.
10. Consider the cost, health benefits, tire protection, lower insurance rates, and other benefits with a municipal water supply.
4.4 PUBLIC UTILITIES AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES
4.4.1 SANITARY SEWER SERVICE
The Village of Ferryville sanitary sewer system serves the downtown residences and businesses. It is a pond system constructed in 1970's with the help of grants. The Village maintains a fund for maintenance and improvements. The system has capacity for current residences and businesses, plus some expansion (due to formerly also serving a cheese factory) and should serve the Village for the foreseeable future. The entire higher elevation development at the Eagle Mountain Subdivision and the areas along CHT "C" do not have sanitary sewer service and must currently depend on private septic tank and tile field disposal methods.
The Wisconsin DNR has control over how the sewage treatment lagoons operate and the quality of wastewater discharged into Sugar Creek. These requirements continue to be restricted more and more. Therefore, the prospect of having to do a complete replacement of the treatment facility with a mechanical plant is a strong possibility. The current capital improvement funds in no way could pay for such a facility. See the recommendations to follow.
The sanitary sewer system in the downtown area is leaking, allowing infiltration of ground water and adding to the load to be treated at the lagoons. Significant repairs are required. Also there are several sewage lift stations in the system. These are in metal manholes, subject to corrosion. The pumps are old and frequently break down. See the recommendations to follow regarding upgrading and replacement.
The payment for the cost of operating the municipal wastewaters collection and treatment facilities comes directly from those so served. The residents who have private sewage treatment facilities (septic tanks and fields) do not participate in these costs.
The collection and treatment of wastewater is a major cost item in the operation of the Village and the overall operation of and funding for is a major part of Village budgets but separate from the operating budget for other services.
4.4.2 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
system can be a very simple series of natural drainage ways or a complex system of culverts, pipes, and drains. Either way, the purpose of the system is to store and channel water to specific areas, diminishing the impact of non-point source pollution.
In the area along Highway 35 where there are curbs, the storm water in handled by a series of inlets and underground storm sewer systems carrying the water to the Mississippi river. The run-off from the higher land areas passes under the highways via culverts. Recently the Wisconsin OOT has decided that these Highway 35 buried facilities are to be maintained by the Village.
Beginning in August 2004, any construction sites disturbing more than one acre of land must get state permits and keep soil on their land during and after construction (NR 151, 216). The threshold was lowered from five acres to one acre to comply with new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Phase 2 Storm Water Regulations. The purpose of the regulation is to lower and control the amount of sedimentation that reaches Wisconsin rivers and lakes. Refer to the WI DNR for more information. Ferryville recently adopted an ordinance dealing mainly with land disturbance on areas of less than one acre.
4.4.3 WATER SUPPLY
Drinking water for the residents of and businesses in the Village of Ferryville comes from private wells. Since Village water comes from private wells, the future demand for water will depend on the number of new homes and businesses that are constructed (see Chapter 2, Housing), unless a municipal water system is installed.
Wells are safe, dependable sources of water if sited wisely and built correctly. Wisconsin has had well regulations since 1936, and today is recognized as a national leader in well protection. NR 812 (formerly NR 112), Wisconsin's Administrative Code for Well Construction and Pump Installation, is administered by the DNR. The Well Code is based on the premise that if a well and water system is properly located, constructed, installed, and maintained, the well should provide safe water continuously without a need for treatment. Refer to the WI DOC, the Crawford County Department of Zoning and Sanitation and Chapter 5, Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources for more information on water quality and well regulations.
To improve the fire insurance ratings for Village properties and to replace the private wells, a municipal water supply is envisioned for some time in the future. This also will tend to create better health for the residents, since wells can become contaminated in some situations.
Currently fire departments must depend upon tanker trucks to haul water to tires.
4.4.4 SOLIO WASTE DISPOSALAND RECYCLING FACILITIES
The Village of Ferryville provides curbside pick-up of garbage and materials for recycling. Garbage is picked-up weekly, and recycling materials collected once bi-weekly. The current solid waste and recycling system is anticipated to meet the needs of Village residents in the future. The Village offers clean-up days twice annually.
There are no operating or closed landfills in the Village of Ferryville Refer to the WI DNR, the Crawford County Department of Landfill, and the Department of Zoning and Sanitation for more information on landfill regulations.
4.4.6 PARKS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES
Refer to Chapter 5, Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources for information on local park and recreation facilities.
4.4.7 TELECOMMUNICATION AND TV CABLE FACILITIES
Ferryville is served by the CenturyTel Communications Company (DBA) (Telephone USA of Wisconsin LLC), Verizon North Inc-WI Operation, Richland-Grant Telephone and Powercom Corporation(DBA) offering regular telephone as well as Internet connection services. Only the area along and near Highway 35 is served by the Media-Com cable services, north of Sugar Creek.
4.4.8 POWER PLANTS AND TRANSMISSION LINES
Crawford County is part of the Alliant / Wisconsin Power and Light Company and the Scenic Rivers Energy Cooperative which serve areas of Southwestern Wisconsin. The Alliant services include the area along and near Highway 35 from the Grandview Motel south to Sugar Creek as well as along Highway C in the Village and in Freeman Township, as well as the Eagle Mountain subdivision. Elsewhere, north of the Grandview Motel, south of Sugar Creek and in the Town of Freeman the electric service is provided by Scenic Rivers.
4.4.9 CEMETERIES
Refer to Chapter 5, Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources for information on local cemeteries.
4.4.10 POSTAL SERVICE
There is one US Post Office in the Village of Ferryville.
4.4.11 MUNICIPAL BUILDING
The Ferryville Village Hall serves as the meeting place for the Village Board and other groups. The Ferryville First Responders and the Ferryville Fire Department also use the facility. There is a limited usage addition at the rear for vehicle storage. There is no room for permanent offices for the Village Clerk or the Village Treasurer.
4.4.12 POLICE, FIRE, AND EMERGENCY SERVICES
The Crawford County Sheriff's Department provides police services. Fire and Emergency Medical Services are provided by the Ferryville First Responders as well as the Ocooch Mountain EMS services from Gays Mills. Fire protection is provided by the Ferryville Volunteer Fire Department.
Other nearby communities share with Ferryville the areas with the mutual aid help system as needed.
4.4.13 LIBRARY FACILITIES
There is no library in the Village of Ferryville.
4.4.14 PRIMARY. SECONDARY. AND HIGHER EDUCATION FACILITIES The DeSoto School District serves the Village of Ferryville.
4.4.15 CHILD CARE FACILITIES
There are no known licensed childcare facilities in Ferryville.
4.4.16 HEALTHCARE FACILITIES
There are no health care facilities in the Village of Ferryville. Residents must travel to other communities to receive hospital care. Based on the Village of Ferryville's current population and projections for ages 60 and over (See Issues and Opportunities Chapter 1), there seems to be an indication for a continued demand for health care facilities. Over the next 25 years, the population of individuals 60 and over may well increase due to the better health of the country in general.
This trend of an aging population can be found throughout Crawford County and Wisconsin. As the population ages there will be an increased demand for all types of health care facilities.
Therefore, the Village of Ferryville should continue to work with the La Crosse hospitals, Prairie du Chien Memorial Hospital, Vernon Memorial Hospital and other medical facilities to make sure that there is an adequate supply of health care facilities in the future.
4.4.17 NATURAL GAS UTILITY
Nearby Villages are being served by natural gas pipelines. Such a service in Ferryville is likely to make the cost of heating and cooking lower than at present whereby all gas must come in by truck to individual propane tanks on each lot.
4.4.18 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM (CIP)
A CIP is a multi-year scheduling of physical public improvements based on the examination of available fiscal resources, as well as the prioritization of such improvements. Capital improvements are those that include new or expanded physical facilities that are relatively large, expensive, and permanent. Street improvements, public libraries, water and sewer lines, and park and recreation facilities are common examples of capital improvements. The Village of Ferryville does not currently have a CIP. There are some advantages with not having a CIP when it comes to getting state aid and grants, since those with no "spare funds" are more likely to receive help.
4.4.19 UTILITIES AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS
There are a number of available state and federal agencies and programs to assist communities with public works projects.
4.5.1 WATER SUPPLY
Efforts should be started in the near future to obtain State and/or Federal funding for a municipal water service for the entire Ferryville area.
4.5.2 WASTEWATER DISPOSAL
While the current sewage lagoons are meeting current DNR treatment requirements, it is very likely that increased restrictions will require significant upgrading of the plant. Efforts should be made to find State and/or Federal funding for any plant upgrading required.
The current sewage collection system downtown is old and has leaks, deteriorated lift systems, etc. Here again State and/or Federal funding assistance should be sought to upgrade these facilities. There is an immediate need.
4.5.3 NATURAL GAS SERVICE
The natural gas services in the area should be investigated to determine if extension to Ferryville is possible and the relative cost savings, if any, should be evaluated before such an improvement is taken on.
4.5.4 VILLAGE MAINTENANCE SHOP
Land for siting such a facility is not presently within the ownership of the Village. Efforts should be put forth to fund the purchase of such property and for erection of a shop for housing and repair of Village equipment. association with such land, a covered salt and salted sand storage facility is needed per the demands of the Wisconsin DNR.
4.5.5 OFFICES FOR VILLAGE CLERK AND TREASURER
The current offices for the Village Clerk and the Village Treasurer are in their homes. This is an imposition on these employees and is somewhat of an impediment for residents who wish to go to that office for Village business. A municipal office building or designation should be sought in the next few years.
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5 - AGRICULTURAL, NATURAL, AND CULTURAL RESOURCES
5.1 AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES
The purpose of the Agricultural element is to present agricultural data and provide direction for land use decisions impacting agriculture for the next 20 years.
5.1.2 GOALS
The protection of economically productive areas, including farmland and forests.
5.1.3 OBJECIIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following agricultural resource objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) will guide agricultural resource decisions in the Village of Ferryville over the next 20 years.
1. Preserve the rural character of our community.
2. Encourage the preservation and maintenance of our rural views and vistas.
3. Encourage residential, commercial, and industrial development to areas least suited for agricultural purposes.
4. Co-exist with farmland to ensure safe water and avoid runoff for safe drinking water for our future.
5.1.4 AGRICULTURAL LECONOMY
Zero people living in the Village of Ferryville listed their occupation as farmer or farm manager in the 2000 census. Seeing the number of farmers and farm managers helps provide a sense of how much agriculture is part of the local economy.
At this time, only a little part of a farm is located within Village limits.
5.1.5 AGRICULTURAL INFRASTRUCTURE
At this time, Ferryville does not have any agriculture related infrastructure.
5.1.6 PHYSICALCHARACTERISTICS
Attached is the soils map, Figure Number 7, for the Village of Ferryville. The soil series mapped vary from Dubuque (Du) to Fayette (Fa) on the ridge tops and Medary (Md) on the river terraces with generally the bluff sides mapped as Steep Stoney and Rocky land (St). In the ridge tops the less steep land has a wind-blown clay-silt deposit several feet thick over rock, generally sufficient thickness to permit seepage fields for septic tanks.
Usability of the land depends significantly on the slopes. A significant portion of Ferryville is steeply sloping so that development is difficult there.
5.1.7 CONFLICTS AND THREATS TO AGRICULTURE
There are conflicts with new residents with non-agriculture backgrounds. These include smells and odors, traffic conflicts, animal waste disposal, trespassing, dust, manure and mud on the roads, chemical applications, equipment noise, lights, and fencing requirements.
The Village of Ferryville can work with the Town of Freeman and Crawford County to support appropriate agricultural activities.
5.2 NATURAL RESOURCES
5.2.1 GOALS
Protection of natural areas, including wetlands, wildlife habitats, lakes, woodlands, opens spaces and groundwater resources.
5.2.2 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY
The following natural resource objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) will support the above goal and will guide natural resource decisions in the Village of Ferryville over the next 20 years.
1. Support partnerships with local clubs and organizations in order to protect important natural areas held in common interest.
2. The community will require all proposed public recreational development to conform to all the policies in this Comprehensive Plan.
3. Avoid disturbance to wetlands, shore lands, and floodplains and discourage disturbance to other environmentally sensitive areas and natural corridors.
4. Support tree preservation, municipal tree planting programs, and sustainable forestry practices in and near the Village. Promote tree plantings in our Village.
5. Establish more parks and outdoor recreational amenities, including park expansion.
6. Encourage the suppression and limitation of noxious weeds.
7. Protect major drainage corridors from development in order to aid in storm water runoff and prevent flooding.
8. Explore opportunities to capitalize on local natural resources in conjunction with tourism.
9. Where and when appropriate, utilize county, state, and federal programs or grants to conserve, maintain, and protect natural resources.
5.2.3 COMMON NATURAL RESOURCES
Natural resources are materials occurring in nature and are essential or useful to humans, such as water, air, land, forests, fish and wildlife , topsoil, and minerals.
Some of the Village of Ferryville's natural resources to be protected include the following:
1. Sugar Creek and the water that flows through it, the fish that live there, and the animals that have homes there are important.
2. There is support from the Village for correctly cleaning up, so harmfu1 items do not get into the soil, air, and water.
Keeping residents informed of their jurisdiction's natural resources is a proactive first step in supporting the natural resources and natural resource protection efforts important to the Village of Ferryville.
The Village of Ferryville makes an effort to keep its citizens informed by:
1. Each year a flyer is sent in the tax notice on the proper disposal of items that can be dangerous to the community. Clean-up days are arranged twice a year to take care of this. A reminder is put in the local shopping news.
2. Important information is also available on the Ferryville.com and VisitFerryville.com websites.
Fostering working relationships with the Town of Freeman and Crawford County can help the Village of Ferryville protect shared, contiguous natural areas that give local residents space to pursue recreational opportunities. Tapping into state and federal programs can add to the Village of Ferryville's support efforts to protect community natural resources.
Ferryville can work with neighboring jurisdictions to avoid runoff that may be harmful to the water and soil that might harm Sugar Creek, which flows through the Village.
5.2.5 WATER RESOURCES
Water resources, (both surface and groundwater) are one of the most commonly used natural resources, serving intrinsic and essential functions in the community. Plants, animals, and people all consume water on a daily basis. All Village of Ferryville residents use groundwater for domestic water consumption.
Water is one of the most easily contaminated resources. Because of its mobile nature, contaminants can travel far from their source through the water cycle. Contaminants in the water cycle coming from a variety of sources are commonly known as non­point source pollution (NPSP). The Village of Ferryville reduces NPSP by having a wastewater treatment system and a sewer system. Overall, water resources are protected by regular testing of the sewer system, to make sure it is functioning properly.
5.2.5.1 GROUNDWATER
Groundwater is the water beneath the earth's surface. Groundwater fills wells and flows from springs. It is a critical resource, not only because it is used on a daily basis, but also because rivers, streams, and other surface water depends on it for recharge.
Groundwater can easily be contaminated through non-point source pollution.
A watershed is the land area from which all surface water and groundwater drains into a stream system. Groundwater aquifers can be contained within a single watershed or can be so large that several watersheds are within the aquifer. The Village of Ferryville is in the Rush Creek and Sugar Creek watersheds.
It is important to keep the groundwater resource in mind for many areas of comprehensive planning. Ultimately, what takes place above ground directly affects groundwater below. There are a variety of activities that impact water resource quality. Potential pollution sources that can affect groundwater include but are not limited to:

1. On-site Septic Systems
2. Sewage Treatment Plants
3. Sanitary Landfills
4. Underground Storage Tanks
5. Feedlots
6. Junkyards
7. Pesticide and Fertilizer Applications
8. Road Salt
9. Unsewered Subdivisions
10. Gas Stations
11. Chemical Spills
12. Leaking Sewer Lines


Pinpointing pollution sources can be made easier by identifying the location and extent of groundwater recharge areas, as well as the extent of the local watershed, so communities can plan where and how much development can be built, with the least amount of impact to water resources. Contamination of local drinking water resources can be devastating, very costly to reverse, and affects all area residents. The Village of Ferryville protects its drinking water supply by disposing of all private sewer systems, installing Village sewer connections, and keeping the system inspected. Underground storage tanks are also electronically monitored.
Another way to protect drinking water is to utilize a wellhead protection plan. The Village of Ferryville does not have a wellhead protection plan at this time.
5.2.5.2 GROUNDWATER SUPPLY
The Groundwater Bill (2003 Act 310) addresses groundwater quantity issues, requiring approval for sighting, fees, and an environmental review. While this legislation is currently more relevant in areas of the state experiencing severe water quantity issues (such as Southeast Wisconsin), the principle of controlling groundwater withdrawal in all parts of the state is quite important and is a growing concern for the future. A State level groundwater advisory committee has been organized to address groundwater management.
5.2.5.3 SURFACE WATER
Surface water is all water naturally open to the atmosphere such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, ponds, streams, impoundments, seas, and estuaries. These water courses provide recreational opportunities, such as fishing, boating, swimming, and passive recreational opportunities like bird watching and sunbathing. The rivers and their feeder streams provide habitat for fish, mussels, insects, and other wildlife. By avoiding runoff, the Village protects its surrounding surface waters. Shore lands in the Village are protected by being under the "Combined Flood Plain and Shoreland-Wetland Zoning Ordinance."
5.2.5.4 WETLANDS
Wetlands serve a variety of functions, including playing an important role in stormwater management and flood control, filtering pollutants, recharging groundwater, providing a habitat for many wildlife species and plants, and offering open space and passive recreational opportunities. Wetlands include all marshes, swamps, fens, bogs, and those areas excluded from cultivation or other uses because they are intermittently wet.
The Village of Ferryville is in the Western Coulee and Ridge ecological landscape, as defined by the 2002 Land Legacy Report put out by the WI DNR This landscape is characterized by highly eroded and unglaciated topography. Because of the hilly terrain, wetlands in the area are primarily associated with the rivers and streams of the area, and not in more generally level or upland areas.
The Village follows county and state wetland regulations on the wetlands within the jurisdiction. Go to http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/water/fhp/wetlands/facts.shtml for more information.
See Figure Numbers 6 and 6A for Mississippi Valley Conservancy wetlands and related data in the Sugar Creek Valley area.
5.2.5.5 FLOODPLAINS
A floodplain is a low area of land adjacent to a stream or other water source that is subject to flooding and holds the overflow of water during a flood. Flooding can occur in any year. For that reason, development should not occur in drainage ways and floodplains since they serve as storm water runoff systems and flood mitigation landscape features.
The Wisconsin DNR currently (2009) is developing new maps for Crawford County showing the areas prone to flooding that will be the official map for Ferryville's flood prone areas. The outlines of the Mississippi River and Sugar Creek flood plains are indicated by the dotted lines on Figure Numbers 6 and 6A.
The Village is also part of the Rush Creek Watershed Project.
The Village of Ferryville has a flood plain ordinance.
5.2.6 WILDLIFE
5.26. IMPORTANCE OF BIODIVERSITY
Biodiversity is the full spectrum of life forms and the many ecological processes that support them. Protecting the biodiversity is essential to core values such as maintaining clean air and water, providing adequate habitat for the state's flora and fauna, maintaining a vibrant economy, and providing recreational opportunities. Biodiversity protection depends on the sustainability of diverse ecosystems, such as the mosaic of forests, agricultural lands, grasslands, bluffs, coastal zones, and aquatic communities present in Wisconsin. It a1so depends upon the conservation of each ecosystem's basic components - the natural communities, plants and anima1s within them. Ecosystems contain a variety of species that are unique in some way and provide value to the diversity of the individual ecosystem and the state overall.
It is important to view biodiversity at all levels to ensure the adequate conservation of Wisconsin's environment.

5.2.6.2 NATURAL COMMUNITIES
The Village of Ferryville is in the Western Coulee and Ridges landscape. (See Figure Numbers 6, 6A and 7 or go to http://dnr.wi.gov/landscapes/ for detailed descriptions and management opportunities for each ecological landscape.) The Western Coulee and Ridges landscape has steep sided hills that are heavily forested and often managed for hardwood production. Agricultural activities are typically confined to valley floors and ridge tops. The largest concentration of hillside prairies in the world is found in this landscape. Hillside prairies often support numerous species of rare plants, insects, and reptiles.
Ferryville protects the landscape and its natural communities by planting trees in the Village and supporting the Rush Creek Watershed Project by following county and state regulations.
5.2.6.3 STATE NATURAL AREAS
State Natural Areas are important not only because they showcase the best and most pristine parts of Wisconsin, but also because they provide excellent wildlife habitat and undisturbed natural communities. Many threatened, endangered, and state special concern species can be found in these areas.
There are six State Natural Areas in Crawford County. Ferryville has the Sugar Creek State Natural Area and the Rush Creek State Natural Area Go to: http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/er/sna/ for more information on State Natural Areas.
Also note the Mississippi Valley Conservancy areas in the Sugar Creek Valley area as shown on Figure Number 6A.
5.2.6.4 ENDANGERED SPECIES
While the conservation of plants, animals and their habitat should be considered for all species, this is particularly important for rare or declining species.
Both the state and federal governments prepare their own separate lists of such plant and animal species but do so working in cooperation with one another, as well as with various other organizations and universities. The WI DNR's Endangered Resources Program monitors endangered, threatened, and special concern species and maintains the state's Natural Heritage Inventory (NHI) database. This program maintains data on the locations and status of rare species in Wisconsin and these data are exempt from the open records law due to their sensitive nature.
1. The Wisconsin Endangered Species Law was enacted to afford protection for certain wild animals and plants that the Legislature recognized as endangered or threatened and in need of protection as a matter of general state concern.
2. The Federal Endangered Species Act (http://endangered.fws .gov/esa.html) also protects animals and plants that are considered endangered or threatened at a national level.
3. A complete listing of the State of Wisconsin's Natural Heritage Inventory can be found at DNR's website at: http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/er/nhi/
5.2.7 FOREST RESOURCES
As of 2005 , there were 142,689 acres of forest cover in Crawford County, about 41% of the County's total land area. The forests in Ferryville can be noted from the photomap used in Figure Number 7. For more information, see http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/forestry/SmartForestry/index.htm
5.2.7.1 URBAN FORFSTS
There are a number of benefits associated with an urban forest including:
1. Slows storm water flow
2. Intercepts and absorbs rainwater
3. Alleviates pressure on drainage ways
4. Provides wildlife habitat
5. Provides relief against wind, heat, and cold
Since property owners have experienced tree losses to insects or disease in the past, tree planting is encouraged in the Village. In this way, Ferryville supports the tenets of urban forestry.
Ferryville has Managed Forest law properties. It is the recommendation of the Plan Commission that the Village of Ferryville develop an ordinance that effectively prevents the renewal of existing DNR permits for Managed Forests in Ferryville and also effectively prevents the addition of any more acreage in Ferryville in the Wisconsin DNR Managed Forest Law Program until Payment in Lieu of Taxes fully equals or exceeds the lost1ax revenue.
5.2.8 GEOLOGIC AND MINERAL RESOURCES
Soils and geology are also important planning considerations, particularly when thinking about new development. However, it is important that these resources not be abused, overused, or contaminated. Particular attention must be paid when development is occurring on steeper slopes.
Most of south/southwest Wisconsin's bedrock is sedimentary rock, consisting of sandstone and shale or limestone. Metallic resources in the region include lead and zinc but there is no evidence of metallic mining in the Village of Ferryville. Non-metallic resources include sand, gravel, and limestone. Limestone for road building is one of the most significant non-metallic geologic resources in the area today.
5.2.8.1 NON-METALLIC MINE RECLAMATION
In June of 2001, all Wisconsin counties were obliged to adopt an ordinance for non­metallic mine reclamation. The Village of Ferryville has not adopted a non-metallic reclamation ordinance of its own. The purpose of the ordinance is to achieve acceptable final site reclamation to an approved post-mining land use in compliance with uniform reclamation standards. Uniform reclamation standards address environmental protection measures including topsoil salvage and storage, surface and groundwater protection, and concurrent reclamation to minimize acreage exposed to wind and water erosion.
5.2.8.2 QUARRIES
The Village of Ferryville has no quarries within its boundaries, but one exists within the extraterritorial areas.
5.2.9 OPEN SPACE AND PARKS
The value of open space lies in its inherent protection of ecologically sensitive areas including wetlands and water resources, important wildlife habitat, and sensitive soils. Preserving open spaces not only directly protects resources, but the space itself becomes a vital buffer zone since nothing can replace the visual impact of open space, whether it is agricultural land or woodlands. Open space can take the form of parks, cropland and pastures, greenbelts, wetlands, or floodplains. It can also serve many functions for a community other than recreation, such as preservation of scenic and natural resources, flood management, protection of water resources, preserving prime agricultural land, limiting development that may occur, buffering incompatible land uses, and structuring the community environment.
5.2.10 LOCAL PARK AND RECREATION RESOURCES
Although the Village of Ferryville does not have an Outdoor Recreation Plan promoting the Village's recreational resources, the natural resources of Ferryville attract numerous recreational users, such as hunters, :fishermen, campers, bird watchers, cyclists, snowmobilers, bikers, 4- wheelers, etc.
Ferryville amenities are:
1. Village boat landing
2. Sugar Creek Park
3. Riverview Park observation deck
4. Sugar Creek Trout Fishing
5.2.11 LANDCOVER
Figure Numbers 6, 6A, and 7 show the number of natural resources in and near the Village of Ferryville. Figure Number 7 also shows the location of forested lands, open water, and wetlands.
5.3 CULTURAL RESOURCES
The purpose of this section is to inventory and support the management of cultural resources in the Village of Ferryville.
5.3.1 CULTURAL RESOURCE PUBLICATIONS OR DOCUMENTATION
Maintaining a written record of cultural resources is an excellent way of educating residents about a community's past as well as encouraging tourism. The Village has two websites: Ferryville.com and visitferryville.com providing information promoting its local cultural resources.
5.3.2 LOCAL HISTORICAL SOCIETIES
There is no local historical society in the Village of Ferryville. For more information on cultural resources, contact the Crawford County Historical Society:
Crawford County Historical Society
29449 Pronold Ln. Crawford Center, WI 53581
Phone: (608) 647-4860

5.3.3 MUSEUM OR CULTURAL RESOURCE CENTER
Another way of preserving the past is through a local museum or cultural resource center. Ferryville does not have a local museum.
5.3.4 HISTORICAL
Wisconsin Historical Markers identify, commemorate, and honor the important people, places, and events that have contributed to the state's rich heritage. The Wisconsin Historical Society's Division of Historic Preservation administers the Historical Markers program. Contact them for more information.
A Historical Marker has been placed in Ferryville at the Riverview Park. It commemorates Patrick Lucey, Former Governor, who was born in Ferryville.
5.3.5 CULTURAL RESOURCE PROGRAMS AND SPECIAL EVENTS
Cultural resource programs and special events are very effective methods of bringing people of a community together to celebrate their cultural history. Not only do these special events build community spirit, but they can also be important to the local economy. Special events in Ferryville include Ferryville Bluff Daze, Amish Market in the Park, Bald Eagle Watching Day, etc.
5.3.6 CHURCHES
Churches historically have had a significant impact on the culture of a community. They sometimes are also the only places where rural residents can gather to discuss important issues in their community. There are no churches in Ferryville, but several are located within reasonable driving distances and are attended by some Ferryville residents.
5.3.7 CEMETERIES
Cemeteries are identified as prominent historic and cultural resources. They can provide a historic perspective of an area, providing names and ethnicities of previous residents, linking a community to its past. Ferryville has a cemetery on Cemetery Road, under the management of the Village.
5.3.8 ARCHITECIURE AND HISTORY INVENTORY (AHI)
The Architecture and History Inventory (AHI) is a collection of information on historic buildings, structures, sites, objects, and historic districts throughout Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Historical Society's Division of Historic Preservation maintains the inventory. Contact the Wisconsin Historical Society for more information about the inventory.
5.3.9 ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE INVENTORY (ASI)
The Archaeological Site Inventory (ASI) is a collection of archaeological sites, mounds, unmarked cemeteries, marked cemeteries, and cultural sites (at the town level) throughout Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Historical Society's Division of Historic Preservation maintains the inventory. Similar to the AHI, the ASI is not a comprehensive or complete list; it only includes sites reported to the Historical Society. The Historical Society estimates that less than 1% of the archaeological sites in the state have been identified.
Wisconsin law protects Native American burial mounds, unmarked burials, and all marked and unmarked cemeteries from intentional disturbance. Contact the Wisconsin Historical Society for more information about the inventory.
5.3.10 STATE AND NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
The AHI contains all the documented historic sites in a community, as well as a list of those sites that are on the State and National Register of Historic Places. The National Register is the o:fficial national list of historic properties in America worthy of preservation, maintained by the National Park Service (U.S. Department of the Interior). The State Register is Wisconsin's official listing of state properties determined to be significant to Wisconsin's heritage and is maintained by the Wisconsin Historical Society's Division of Historic Preservation. Both listings include sites, buildings, structures, objects, and districts that are significant in national, state, or local history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. Contact the National Park Service or State Historical Society for more information on registration.
5.3.11 GOALS
Preservation of cultural, historic, and archaeological sites.
5.3.12 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following cultural resources objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) will support the above goal and will guide cultural resource decisions in the Village of Ferryville over the next 20 years.
1. Encourage the education of local residents on the importance of cultural resources.
2. Continue to support important community festivals and cultural events.
3. Promote tourism opportunities and continue to pursue efforts to capitalize on local resources in conjunction with programs like walking tours, Wisconsin Historical Markers Program, distributing ATV or bike trail maps, and maintaining trails.
4. Where and when appropriate, utilize county, state, and federal programs or grants to conserve, maintain, and protect cultural resources.
5. Encourage the Wisconsin Department of Commerce and the Crawford County Zoning Department to enforce the requirements for flood proof holding tanks for any non-sewered existing developments in the flood plain.
6 - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
6.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
Economic development is about working together to retain and create jobs that provide a good standard of living for individuals. Increased personal income and wealth increases the tax base and allows the community to provide services residents want.
Economic development is important because it pays the bills. Jobs support families and tax revenues support the community. Through the comprehensive planning process, residents can find a direction and act proactively for improved economic development, benefiting the whole community.
6.2 GOALS
1. Promote the expansion or stabilization of the current economic base and the creation of employment opportunities.
2. Provide adequate infrastructure and public services and an adequate supply of developable land to meet existing and future market demand for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
3. Promote the redevelopment of land with existing infrastructure and public services and the maintenance and rehabilitation of existing residential, commercial, and industrial structures.
4. Encourage entrepreneurial business activities of all sizes to increase the tax base and local employment.
6.3 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following Economic Development objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) support the above goals to help guide local economic development decisions for the next 20 years.
We recommend:
1. Local telephone and cable companies provide broadband Internet services.
2. Home based entrepreneurial activities that have no or minimal impact on adjacent properties. An ordinance to regulate their approval may be needed.
3. Entrepreneurial activity such as the sale of locally grown and created products and services from roadside markets, home based sales and store front shops.
4. Identifying locations that are appropriate for commercial and light manufacturing, while keeping in mind adequate utilities and road access.
5. Continued support of local events intended to attract people to the Village, such as the Ferryville River Bluff Daze and Tractor Pull, Market in the Park, and Bald Eagle Watching Day.
6. Commercial activities in existing commercial locations where public roads and facilities and services have capacity to accommodate high volumes of traffic, parking, and other public needs.
7. Commercial activities in appropriate areas other than the downtown business district in instances where no commercial space exists in the CBD and when the proposed use is more appropriate elsewhere.
8. Discouraging heavy industrial and commercial businesses in the community.
6.4 ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BASE AND LABOR FORCE
Village of Ferryville's economic base is diverse but mostly in the service sector, in commercial and retail trade. The local labor force, the jobs available in Crawford County and in adjacent counties are important.
Tourism contributes to the local economic base. For the same reason that residents want to live here, visitors want to enjoy the tremendous natural beauty and partake in four-season recreational opportunities. The setting is a competitive advantage for local job creation by targeting for growth in tourist services and attraction businesses.
6.4.1 ECONOMIC BASE
The economic base includes a review of revenue generated within the community, revenue attracted from outside the community, and revenue lost or spent outside the community.
Increasing the value of raw materials, attracting contracts or sales from outside the county or municipality, and creating opportunities for residents to spend their money locally all add to the economy.
6.4.2 ANALYSIS OF THE LABOR FORCE
Ferryville, according to the 2000 census, has a population over the age of 16 of 149. Of that figure, 92 are in the labor force. However, gradually the community is growing older, and many residents have moved in from elsewhere to retire here. Therefore, the labor force is expected to become less and less. The 2010 census is expected to reflect this change.
6.5 ANALYSIS OF NEW BUSINESS ANO INDUSTRY DESIRED
Community survey results indicate a majority of residents in the Village of Ferryville support coordinated efforts for active recruitment of new business, but not with much emphasis on industry. In general the addition of tourism related businesses appears to be the trend.
6.5.1 STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
For success in economic development, a community needs to identify its strengths and weaknesses, then emphasize the strengths, and minimize the effects of the weaknesses. Following is a summary of strengths and weaknesses based on a review of community survey responses and other plan elements.
VILLAGE OF FERRYVILLE STRENGTHS
1. People want to live here for the beauty and clean environment.
2. A community that is safe, friendly and a great place to raise a family.
3. The cost of living is lower than most.
4. Proximity to larger town.
VILLAGE OF FERRYVILLE WEAKNESSES
1. A population with slow growth and many workers nearing retirement.
2. Lack of good job opportunities, which contributes to young workers leaving the area.
3. Lack of locations for businesses with adequate infrastructure, such as parking.
4. Distance for emergency services.
5. Fire protection, EMTs, and First Responders are volunteers only (changed 5/12/10).
6.6 ANALYSIS OF BUSINESS
6.6.1 EXISTING BUSINESS
Clusters of businesses are also located in the central downtown areas of the Village. Like the national economy, the Crawford County economy is experiencing a gradual shift of main street businesses from selling material goods to selling services.
6.6.2 FUTURE BUSINESS
As employment in the manufacturing sector of the national and local economy has remained flat during the past fifteen years, communities often broaden their industry park covenants and zoning to allow businesses that support manufacturing and industry such as business services, suppliers, and warehousing.
Ferryville has a limited inventory of land designated for industry and served by utilities and roads. As part of an economic development plan, it is important for municipalities and the county to work together to identify additional acres for business development. Of the acres currently identified as available, some may be difficult to develop due to environmental, cost, or other issues. Further, large and relatively flat sites need to be available to attract some large development projects.
A review of community survey responses and vision statements for Crawford County municipalities suggests the degree of support for business park development ranges between mild to strong. For the Village of Ferryville, 63% think the community should provide at least some land with infrastructure (water, sewer, access, etc.) for commercial or light manufacturing. Further, 90% agree that development at the edge of cities and Villages should be required to have municipal water and sewer services.
The Village of Ferryville noted that there are buildings and building sites available for commercial or light manufacturing businesses, but the Planning Commission was unsure if there was consensus support in the Village to establish or expand locations where such manufacturing could locate.
6.6.3 ENVIRONMENTALLY CONTAMINATED SITES
The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Remediation and Redevelopment Tracking System (BRRTS) lists the current and historic sites in Ferryville.
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7 - INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION
7.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
Many cities, towns, villages, and counties begin cooperative arrangements to lower costs and promote efficiency. Intergovernmental cooperation is an effective way for local governments to respond to changing and diverse needs by collaborating with neighbors, while maintaining their own identity. Most arrangements involve only two governmental units, but there are also agreements among multiple units. Intergovernmental cooperation may range from formal joint power agreements to unwritten understandings. For instance, two communities may have an unwritten agreement about sharing fire or EMT services, road repair equipment, or a cluster of cities and towns may have a written agreement concerning snow removal or economic development. If an agreement can be reached among two or more units of government, services can often be provided with substantial cost savings. Cooperation can eliminate unnecessary duplication of services or purchasing of equipment: the opportunities are endless. This section examines what intergovernmental cooperation the Village of Ferryville is engaged in today and what they may consider in the future.
7.2 GOAL
Encouragement of coordination and cooperation among nearby units of government.
7.3 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following are the Intergovernmental Cooperation objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) that support the above goal and will guide intergovernmental cooperation decisions in Ferryville over the next 20 years.
1. Work with local governments, state and federal agencies, the regional planning commission, and local school districts to identify and coordinate land use and community development policies and initiatives by exchanging information about items of mutual concern.
2. Explore new opportunities to cooperate with other local units of government to utilize shared public services, staff, or equipment where appropriate.
3. When appropriate, intergovernmental agreements with other local units of government should be created through written contracts or agreements.
7.4 EXISTING AND POTENTIALAREAS OF COOPERATION
7.4 EXISTING AREAS OF COOPERATION
Figure Numbers 1 and 2 show the locations of roadways in the Town of Freeman and the Village of Ferryville and the roadways they share. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation maintains the traveled way of Highway 35 through Ferryville.
Ferryville receives occasional services, at a cost, from the Crawford County Highway Department.
Ferryville's First Responders and Fire Department serve areas in the Town of Freeman and receive EMT services from a private EMT service located in Gays Mills.
The Village does not have any agreements or contracts with any of the school districts that serve Ferryville.
7.4.2 POTENTIAL AREAS OF COOPERATION
These include cooperative training between EMT groups and Fire departments, as well as the Crawford County Department of Emergency Management.
Eventually there may be parts of the Town of Freeman that could be annexed to Ferryville. Therefore, some of the recommendations in this Comprehensive Plan have been developed to cover some of the requirements or features that should be included in those annexed areas.
7.5 INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS
7.5.1 CONFLICTS AND SOLUTIONS
The Village of Ferryville indicated there were neither existing nor anticipated conflicts with its neighboring jurisdictions.
INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS - WI DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION
The Wisconsin Land Council was created to gather and analyze land use and planning related information, coordinate high priority state initiatives including the development of a Wisconsin land information system and provide recommendations to the Governor for improvements to the existing statewide planning framework. The Council is dedicated to identifying ways to enhance and facilitate planning efforts of Wisconsin's local governments and to improve the coordination and cooperation of state agencies in their land use activities.
LEAGUE OF WISCONSIN MUNICIPALITIES
The League of Wisconsin Municipalities is a not-for-profit association of municipalities. First established in 1898, the League acts as an information clearinghouse, lobbying organization, and legal resource for Wisconsin municipalities. Its membership consists of 386 Villages and all of the 190 cities in the state.
WISCONSIN COUNTIES ASSOCIATION
WCA is an association of county governments assembled for the purpose of serving and representing countries.
SOUTHWESTERN WISCONSIN REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION
The SWWRPC is the area-wide planning and development agency serving the five counties of Grant, Green, Iowa, Lafayette, and Crawford.
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8 - LAND USE
8.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
The purpose of this chapter is to analyze how the land in the Village of Ferryville is currently being used and what constraints to development exist in these areas. This chapter will also discuss the future land use needs in the Village of Ferryville. Based on the information in this chapter, and preceding chapters, a set of goals and policies was developed to help guide the land use decisions in the Village of Ferryville over the next 20 years.
8.2 GOALS
The following are Land Use Goals:
1. Promotion of the redevelopment of lands with existing infrastructure and public services and the maintenance and rehabilitation of existing residential, commercial, and industrial structures.
2. Protection of natural areas, including wetlands, wildlife habitats, lakes, rivers, woodlands, open spaces, and groundwater resources.
3. Protection of economically productive areas, including farmland and forests.
4. Encouragement of land uses and regulations that promote efficient development patterns and relatively low municipal, state governmental and utility costs.
5. Preservation of cultural, historical, and archaeological sites.
6. Encouragement of coordination and cooperation among nearby units of government.
7. Building of community identity by revitalizing main streets and enforcing design standards.
8. Providing adequate infrastructure and public services and an adequate supply of developable land to meet existing and future market demand for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
9. Promoting the expansion or stabilization of the current economic base and the creation of employment opportunities at the state, regional and local levels.
10. Planning and development of land uses that creates or preserves our unique urban and rural community.
11. Providing an integrated, efficient, and economical transportation system that affords mobility, convenience and safety that meets the needs of all citizens, including transit­ dependent and disabled citizens.
12. Encourage the use of public lands to enhance recreation and tourism when determined to be in the best interest of the Village of Ferryville.
8.3 OBJECTIVES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following are the Land Use objectives and policy recommendations (not in order of priority) that support the above goals and will guide land use decisions in the Village of Ferryville over the next 20 years:
1. Maintain the small-town character of Ferryville by avoiding developments that would alter its character.
2. Recognize the critical role that farmland, open space, historical architecture, scenic vistas, and riverscapes, natural resources and designated features, scenic roads, archeological, arid cultural features play in defining and enhancing the community's distinctive rural character.
3. Building placement and lot layout should be designed to provide a functional relationship to the site's topography, existing vegetation, and other natural features. The conservation of mature plant species, hedgerows, prairies/oak savannas, and woodlots should be encouraged to preserve the rural character of the community.
4. Discourage new development from areas shown to be unsafe or unsuitable for development due to natural hazards or contamination unless these sites can be remediated to an acceptable condition.
5. For new development in the community, surface water run-off shall be minimized and detained on site if possible or practicable. If it is not possible to detain water on site, down-stream improvements to the channel may be required of the developer to prevent flooding caused by construction. The natural state of water courses, swales, floodways, wetlands, or right-of-way should be maintained as nearly as possible. An erosion control ordinance has been adopted by the Village.
6. Plan for a sufficient supply of developable land for a range of different uses, in areas, types, and densities consistent with the community's wishes and service requirements. A subdivision ordinance should be adopted to apply to any new developments to maintain orderly development that meets these goals and policies.
7. Require detailed neighborhood development plans and phasing plans prior to platting and development of planned residential areas.
8. Support the mixing of compatible, complimentary uses in close proximity to one another, such as small-scale neighborhood retail and service uses close to residential neighborhoods, if in accordance with community wishes.
9. A sign ordinance should be adopted and enforced to help preserve the visual quality of the community.
10. Maintain taxable land where possible.
11. Encourage the use of public land to enhance recreation and tourism when determined to be in the best interest of the Village of Ferryville.
8.4 EXISTING LAND USES
The information below discusses the existing land uses in the Village of Ferryville. An inventory of existing land uses was conducted in 2006 using data from the previous Master Plan, and spot field checks. See Figure Number 4 for general land use categories that are mostly still applicable to this report, with the exception of the Sugar Creek area as described in Figure Numbers 6 and 6A.
Residential - Residential land includes any land with a residential home. There are two large tracts of land devoted exclusively to residential uses. The Eagle Mountain Subdivision contains open land and forests with large lots, approximately 307 acres or 31 percent of the Village area. The Stelter Valley subdivision is mostly wooded, approximately 92 acres or 15 percent of the Village area.
Residential/Commercial refers mainly to the Downtown, older areas of the Village development on either side of Highway 35 - approximately 54 acres or 5 percent of the Village area. An area of similar designation, not so densely developed, with room for some development, is north of Highway 35, east from Highway C and extending to the east Village limits, also including wetlands, flood plain and newly constructed wetland restoration - approximately 95 acres or 10 percent of the Village area. (Another area of combined residential and commercial development lies south of Highway 35 at the east Village limits, north of the railroad - approximately 12 acres or 1 percent of the Village area).
Commercial - Commercial land refers to any parcel that has a business on it but does not include industrial properties. There is no strictly commercial area in Ferryville.
Manufacturing - Industrial - There is no area with this usage.
Public/Semi-Public - Land types including federal, state, and county lands, school property, churches, and cemeteries (approximately 23 acres or 2 percent of the Village area).
Parks/Recreational - Public land used for recreational uses (approximately 23 acres or 2 percent of the Village area).
Environmental Open Space - Includes land that has environmental features such as water, wetlands, or floodplains, such as the Sugar Creek Delta between the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad property and the Mississippi River (approximately 148 acres or 15 percent of the Village area. See Figure Numbers 6 and 6A).
Ag/Conservancy- Includes some areas owned by the Mississippi Valley Conservancy as well as private property, not now developed, but with limited agricultural uses (approximately 243 acres or 24 percent of the Village area. (See Figure Numbers 6 and 6A).
Woodland/Hillside - Land that is heavily wooded (typically found on steep hill sides). These areas are mapped within the Ag/Conservancy areas as well as the two subdivisions indicated above.
Other -Remaining land types that do not fall into the above categories, including roadway right-of-way.
Map Figure Numbers 4, 6 and 6A illustrate the existing land use patterns for the Village of Ferryville. The biggest contributors to the general layout of the Village historically have been the topography of the area as it occurred during the Mississippi River's erosion and deposition history. The following describes some of the key features of the existing land use patterns:
1. The steep slopes facing the Mississippi River contain the area described as Downtown. This area, with the steep slopes, has significant topography restrictions limiting development.
2. The Sugar Creek runs through the Village south end emptying into the Mississippi River. The valley on either side of this creek is a series of terraces next to the bluffs and lowland, wetland flood plain near the creek itself.
3. Most commercial and residential development is located northwest of Sugar Creek Valley area in the Downtown area along Highway 35. The Sugar Creek terraces at the proximity to the Mississippi valley are partly developed for residential and municipal uses.
4. The tops of the bluffs above the Downtown area contain the newly developed Eagle Mountain Subdivision.
8.5 LAND USE TRENDS
The available land for possible change of use is quite limited. The Residential/Commercial area indicated above as located east from Highway C (95 acres) has perhaps 10 acres maximum for some development, whereas at present that land is relatively unused. See Figure Number 6A.
8.5.1 LAND SUPPLY
Agriculture - For all practical purposes, there is such a small area suitable for agriculture that it is practically zero.
Residential - Residential land includes any land with a residential home that does not fall into the agricultural land classification. Practically speaking there is very limited area available for residential use, unless some of that area now designated as Ag/Conservancy is converted to residential land similar to the Eagle Mountain Subdivision development (perhaps as much as 80 acres might fall into this usage), but most of that is very steep sloping topography.
Commercial - Commercial land refers to any parcel that has a business on it but does not include industrial properties. This may be a convenience store, car wash, bank, grocery store, tavern etc., referring to any type of retail or business establishment.
Manufacturing -Manufacturing land refers to business and industry that is engaged in processing, manufacturing, packaging, treatment, or fabrication of materials and products.
Forested - Forested land including production forests and DNR-MFL. This land is in the Ag/Conservancy designation per the 2005 Master Plan, Figure Number 4 and could be re­ classified for other uses or zoned differently. This designation was used for lack of a better term and a different classification should be considered, if necessary for development.
Other - Remaining land types that do not fall into the above categories, including federal, state, and county lands, school property, and cemeteries.
8.5.2 LAND DEMAND
The rough topography and forested areas that have not been developed yet do not appear suitable for industrial or commercial development. Only if these Ag/Conservancy private properties are significantly developed with roads and open areas, they may be considered as potential future residential developments generally in the vacation or secluded home site categories.
8.6 FUTURE LAND USE
To adequately plan for the future growth, a community must be aware of what its future needs will be in terms of additional land. The projection of land use needed is based upon several factors, including historical community growth trends, population forecasts, anticipated economic and land use trends, and several assumptions. Forecasting is an inexact process. Since several outside factors affect the rate of growth of a community, assumptions and the resulting forecasts can only be used as a tool for charting future courses of action. Given the above, it would appear that only limited residential development will be possible within the Village limits. On the contrary, nearby extraterritorial areas are much more likely to be developed, mainly due to the significantly lower development costs that would be possible because of the more level topography.
In extraterritorial areas there appears to be very limited restrictions to residential housing construction, since septic tanks are commonly usable there now. Roadways would be possible due to better topography than within the Village proper.
Where there are activities within Ferryville or the extraterritorial areas and to comply with the goals and recommendations of this Plan, the provisions in the Wisconsin statutes, administrative rules, and guidelines shall be followed as applicable, except where Village ordinances apply.
8.6.1 PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
See the comments in the previous section.
8.6.2 OPPORTUNITIES FOR REDEVELOPMENT
Refer to Chapter 6, Economic Development, Section 6.6.3, for a list of Environmentally Contaminated Sites in Ferryville. The WI-DNR Bureau for Remediation and Redevelopment maintains the database that lists contaminated lands and sites including the following: spills, leaks, Superfund sites, and other contaminated sites that have been reported to the WI-DNR or otherwise discovered. Currently the Ferryville Garage properties on Highway 35, Main Street could be appropriate for redevelopment in the Village. The Plan Commission felt that there are several older structures in the Downtown area that might be either razed or significantly modernized for both residential and commercial purposes, such as stores or restaurants. The Plan Commission also felt that Ferryville could expand and better develop the Village's Sugar Creek Park.
8.7 EXISTING & POTENTIAL LAND USE CONFLICTS
A variety of land uses can potentially cause land use conflicts. One of the most common occurrences, especially in a rural setting, is the presence of non-farm populations near agricultural operations. The presence of small rural lots can create an adverse influence on the continued operation of an agriculture enterprise. Due to only limited current and future agricultural uses within the Village, these potential conflicts do not appear likely to become serious.
8.8 LAND USE AGENCIES ANO PROGRAMS
There are several available state agencies and programs to assist communities with land use projects.
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9 - IMPLEMENTATION
9.1 CHAPTER SUMMARY
The purpose of this chapter is to explain how the comprehensive plan will be utilized to guide future growth and development in the Village of Ferryville and is intended to serve as the blueprint for the future. As change is inevitable, the plan will need to be amended to reflect major changes. Section 9.9 will review how each chapter of the comprehensive plan elements interrelate and how the plan will be monitored and evaluated. Section 9.8 discusses how the plan must be updated at a minimum of once every ten years.
9.2 GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
The following are implementation goals, objectives, and policy recommendations. They support the goals, objectives, policies, and programs specified in the previous eight chapters and will guide the implementation of this comprehensive plan in the Village of Ferryville over the next 20 years.
1. Comply with and enforce the Planning Goals and the Policies and Programs outlined in this Comprehensive Plan.
2. Enforce local ordinances to support the vision noted in Section 9.10.
3. Comply with applicable County, State, and Federal regulations.
4. Amend the local comprehensive plan and local ordinances only after careful evaluation of existing conditions and potential impacts.
5. Update the Comprehensive Plan every 10 years as required by Wisconsin State Statute 66.1001.
9.3 LOCAL ORDINANCE AND REGULATIONS
The intent of the local ordinances and regulations is to control land development within the Village and to influence the developments in the extraterritorial areas, assuming that someday they may be part of the Village proper. By carefully applying these local ordinances and regulations, the Village of Ferryville will be accomplishing goals and policies of the comprehensive plan. Enforcement of such ordinances and regulations serve an important function by ensuring orderly growth and development. The Village of Ferryville will continue to use their Zoning Ordinances as a primary tool of enforcement.
9.4 CONSISTENCY AMONG PLAN ELEMENTS
As required by Wisconsin State Statute 66.1001, all elements included in this plan are consistent with one another and no known conflicts exist. (If there is a question regarding a decision that is not clearly conveyed in the details of this plan, then the decision should be based on the intent of the vision statement.) Ali nine elements included in this plan work to achieve the desired future for the Village of Ferryville.
9.5 SEVERABILITY
If any provision of this Plan shall be found to be invalid or unconstitutional, or if the application of this Plan to any person or circumstances is found to be invalid or unconstitutional, such invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect the other provisions or applications of this Plan, which can be given effect without the invalid or unconstitutional provision or application.
9.6 PLAN ADOPTION
The first official action required to implement the Village of Ferryville Comprehensive Plan is official adoption of the plan by the Plan Commission. (Once the Plan Commission recommends the plan by resolution, the Village Board then needs to adopt the comprehensive plan by ordinance as required by State Statute 66.1001.) The Ferryville Comprehensive Plan will take effect when the Village Board passes it. After the plan is adopted by ordinance, it then becomes the official tool for future development in the next 20 years. The plan is designed to guide development in a consistent manner.
9.7 PLAN AMENDMENTS
Amendments may be necessary due to changes in Village policies, programs, or services, as well as changes in state or federal laws. An amendment may also be needed due to unique proposals presented to the Village. Amendments are any changes to plan text or maps. The Village Board can amend the Ferryville Comprehensive Plan at any time. Proposed amendments should be channeled through the Plan Commission, with final action occurring at the Village Board, including proper public notices and hearings. Amendments should be done with extreme caution. They should not be made simply to avoid local planning pressure.
9.8 PLAN UPDATES
As required by Wisconsin State Statute, this comprehensive plan needs to be updated at least once every ten years. An update is different from an amendment, as an update is a major revision of multiple plan sections including maps. The plan was originally written based on variables that are ever changing and future direction might be inaccurately predicted. A plan update should include public involvement, as well as an official public hearing.
9.9 MEASURING PROGRESS
The success of this comprehensive plan will be measured by the extent to which the Village of Ferryville achieves its vision of the future for their community by following the goals, objectives, policies, and programs outlined in the plan. To do so, the Plan Commission will review this Comprehensive Plan every two (2) years.
9.10 VISION STATEMENT
The following is a review of the vision statement found in Chapter 1, Issues and Opportunities, section 1.8. The vision statement serves as the overall guide for land use decision making in the Village of Ferryville.
Our vision for the Village of Ferryville is to create a place where people want to live and build a better future. High in priority is the improvement of tourist and outdoor activities.
We envision that the recreational opportunities of OUT unique location can be enjoyed by many and therefore will be utilized to bring business to OUT community.
We will promote OUT businesses and attract new ones to OUT area. OUT Village will maintain and promote OUT historical sites.
We will continue to enhance OUT Village parks and the flexibility and beauty of OUT position alongside the Mississippi River.
We will encourage property owners to improve the overall appearance of Ferryville to help bring tourists to the area for enjoyment of the views and facilities.
We will preserve and create a small-town atmosphere with community involvement.
We will offer diversified and cost-efficient services like cable TV and Internet, sewer, garbage/recycling, and keep our Village streets maintained.
We will investigate opportunities of public services such as EMT's, fire department, police, etc.
We will continue to promote OUT Village spring and fall clean-up.
The Village will be dedicated to promoting bike, walking, and snowmobile trails as well as facilities useful in the utilization of the recreational opportunities of the area, including water sports.
We will encourage the participation in government operations by volunteers, especially those with expertise in fields where their input will assist Village employees and Board Members in their duties.
We will protect and foster our natural resources such as the Conservancy areas, the Rush Creek and Sugar Creek recreational areas, and the Mississippi River.
The Village will strive to promote a balance between expenses for recreation facilities, appearance of properties and the tax consequences resulting from this effort.
The Village will pursue economic help from State and Federal agencies to assist us in the expenses of operation and improvements.

We will develop zoning ordinances and enforce them to improve the safety, welfare, and appearance of the Village.

We will develop zoning ordinances and enforce them to make the best use of vacant or deteriorated areas. We also will endeavor to obtain outside financial and administrative help in achieving these goals.
We will investigate the details of improving tire safety and a better health situation for the community with a municipal water supply. State funding for public works projects of this type could be pursued.
City natural gas services also will be investigated and pursued as a supplement to the public utilities of the community.
9.11 GOAL AND POLICY SUMMARY
Comprehensive Plans are comprised of nine elements (Issues and Opportunities, Housing, Transportation, Utilities and Community Facilities, Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources, Economic Development, Intergovernmental Cooperation, Land Use, and Implementation). Each element has policy statements, which contribute to the overall plan, supporting a jurisdiction's vision and goals. Policy statements give the jurisdiction general guidelines to help in making land use decisions.
Chapter goals are summarized in Table 9.1. Plan policies are summarized in Table 9.2. with policies listed by element and showing implementation actions and the party responsible for such actions. The key below describes Table notation.
RESPONSIBILITY
Village Plan Commission - The Plan Commission receives proposals/applications, reviews the proposal against the plan and any local ordinances, and then makes a recommendation to the Village Board.
Village Board - As the elected body of the community, the Village Board acts as the decision-making authority and has the responsibility to make sure that the specific policy is enforced. The Board reviews the Plan Commission's recommendation and makes a final decision.
Table 9.1 Goals
Chapter 1 Issues and Opportunities
Protect and improve the health, safety, and welfare, preserve, and enhance the quality of life, and protect and preserve the character of the community. Control the future development of Ferryville in an orderly fashion, per the requirements of this plan and local ordinances. Being aware that all decisions have a possible effect on taxes.
Chapter 2 Housing
Provide an adequate supply of affordable housing for individuals of all income levels throughout the community. It is likely most of the expansion of housing areas will be done in the extraterritorial areas.
Chapter 3 Transportation
Encouragement of neighborhood design that supports transportation choices.
Provide an integrated, efficient transportation system that affords mobility, convenience, safety, and affordability. It should meet the needs of all citizens, including transit dependent and disabled citizens.
Chapter 4 Utilities and Community Facilities
Providing adequate infrastructure and public services and an adequate supply of developable land to meet existing and future market demand for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
Chapter 5 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources
The protection of economically productive areas, including farmland and forests. (Protection of natural areas, including wetlands, wildlife habitats, lakes, woodlands, open spaces, and groundwater resources.)
Preservation of cultural, historic, and archaeological sites.
Chapter 6 Economic Development
Promote the expansion or stabilization of the current economic base and the creation of a range of employment opportunities.
Provide adequate infrastructure and public services and an adequate supply of developable land to meet existing and future market demand for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
Promote the redevelopment of land with existing infrastructure and public services and the maintenance and rehabilitation of existing residential, commercial, and industrial structures.
Encourage entrepreneurial business activities of all sizes to increase the tax base and local employment.
Chapter 7 Intergovernmental Cooperation
Encouragement for coordination and cooperation among nearby governmental units.
Chapter 8 Land Use
Promotion of the redevelopment of lands with existing infrastructure and public services and the maintenance and rehabilitation of existing residential, commercial, and industrial structures.
Protection of natural areas, including wetlands, wildlife habitats, lakes, rivers, woodlands, open spaces, and groundwater resources.
Protection of economically productive areas, including farmland and forests.
Encouragement of land uses and regulations that promote efficient development patterns and relatively low municipal, state, governmental, and utility costs.
Preservation of cultural, historical, and archaeological sites.
Encouragement of coordination and cooperation among nearby units of government. Building of community identity by revitalizing main streets and enforcing design standards.
Providing adequate infrastructure and public services and an adequate supply of developable land to meet existing and future market demand for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
Promoting the expansion or stabilization of the current economic base and the creation of a range of employment opportunities at the state, regional and local levels.
Planning and development of land uses that create or preserve varied unique urban and rural communities.
Providing an integrated, efficient, and economical transportation system that affords mobility, convenience and safety that meets the needs of all citizens, including transit dependent and disabled citizens.
Encourage the use of public lands to enhance recreation and tourism when determined to be in the best interest of the Village of Ferryville.
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Table 9.2 Implementation
IMPLEMENTATION ACTION KEY
1. Does not require specific action - This policy is a general statement of direction that does not need a specific ordinance or program to be enforced. It is enforced through conscious decision making and by following the local comprehensive plan, which is passed by ordinance. In general the action, if any, involves continuing with an ongoing program or policy.
2. Requires specific action, generally by both the Plan Commission and the Village Board or specifically by the Village Board. A policy is enforced by an existing ordinance or an ordinance currently in development or not yet being developed. This key also applies to adopting specific programs, such as 5-year plans, budgets, etc.
Chapter 2 Housing
1. Protect existing residential neighborhoods from intrusion by incompatible or undesirable land use activities.
2. Provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing for elderly, handicapped and low to moderate income residents.
3. Encourage future residential development in areas that can be served efficiently and economically by public utilities and community facilities and services.
4. Encourage Wisconsin Department of Commerce and the Crawford County Zoning Department to enforce proper sewage disposal from mobile homes in the flood plain (note: enforced by Ferryville' s Combined Flood Plain and Shoreland-Wetland Zoning Ordinance).
5. Enact a subdivision ordinance.
6. Enact a zoning ordinance to accomplish the goals and other items included in this Comprehensive Plan. Example: Lot sizes in new developments.
7. Enact an ordinance dealing with the use of garages for living units on a temporary basis.
Chapter 3 Transportation
1. Develop an annual capital improvements budget along with a 5-year plan for maintenance and improvement to the transportation system.
2. Continue to use the PASER program for prioritizing street improvements.
3. Monitor the need for providing transportation for the elderly and disabled residents of Ferryville.
4. Coordinate transportation improvements with nearby towns and Crawford County Department of Transportation.
5. Revise the ordinance for acceptance of development roads into the Village road system.
Chapter 4 Utilities and Community Facilities
1. Provide a full range of governmental and social services to the citizens of the community.
2. Provide sanitary and storm sewer facilities to existing and future developments.
3. Investigate the possibilities for bringing natural gas into Ferryville.
4. Consider developing and annual capital improvement program with a 5-year time horizon as a guide to continuing and expanding the existing utilities services.
5. Provide adequate police, EMT and fire protection services.
6. Investigate and pursue the construction of a municipal water supply service for the full community area including anticipated future development.
7. Investigate and pursue the construction of an adequately large municipal garage for the housing of Village equipment and the maintenance thereof.
8. Investigate the possibilities for creating an office structure for Village administration purposes.
Chapter 5 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources
1. Ensure that environmental and aesthetic qualities of the community are considered when planning future development.
2. Protect environmentally sensitive areas such as floodplains, wetlands, and wooded areas from urban development.
3. Enforce the existing Ferryville Erosion Control/Land Disturbance Ordinance.
4. Enforce the Ferryville Combined Floodplain and Shoreland-Wetland Zoning Ordinance.
5. Develop a site plan review process to help maintain and improve visual quality and physical design for the Village.
6. Develop or improve existing ordinances for improving the visual appearance of properties to enhance the quality of life and related factors that are important to the residents.
7. Enacts an ordinance to eliminate the DNR Managed Forest Lands within the Village by preventing any new MFL projects and/or renewing the permits of existing MFL projects until the DNR management of the program fully makes up for lost tax revenue from these projects with payments in Lieu of Taxes.
Chapter 6 Economic Development
1. Work with the Crawford County and Wisconsin State agencies in reviewing economic strategies for developing the economic potentials of the community.
2. Work with the private sector in developing new businesses in Ferryville.
3. Encourage economic development in areas that are compatible with adjacent areas.
4. Encourage ways to promote Ferryville tourism using existing resources.
Chapter 7 Intergovernmental Cooperation
1. Continue the cooperative operations for the area fire departments, EMS, and police.
2. Coordinate the Village's Comprehensive Plan with the Town of Freeman and Crawford County.
Chapter 8 Land Use
1. Develop a zoning ordinance using the recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan. Figure Number 4 should be used as a guide in establishing the various zoning districts, as modified by this Comprehensive Plan and actual land use.
2. Enforce or modify the current Erosion Control/Land Disturbance Ordinance to fully follow the recommendations of this Comprehensive plan.
3. Work with all sources to protect all natural areas.
4. Work to preserve cultural, historical, and archaeological sites.
5. Balance Individual property rights with community interests and goals.
6. Encourage the use of public lands to enhance recreational and tourism uses when determined to be in the best interest of the Village of Ferryville.